Galaxy gallery

A gallery of galaxies of our Local Universe, observed with optical light.

All the images have been selected from the Astronomy Picture Of the Day archive, the European Southern Observatory photo gallery, or the Hubble Space Telescope photo gallery: all of them being highly recommended websites to be explored anytime of the day, anytime of the year — you’ll feel small, and eventually better.

You can click on the individual images to access the full resolution version.

Spiral galaxies

This is a gallery of images of spiral galaxies of our Local Universe (less than 150 million light years away), in order of increasing distance from Earth.

Spiral galaxy Andromeda
Andromeda Galaxy (M31), our closest neighbour. 2.5 million light years from Earth, about 220,000 light years wide.
The spiral galaxy M33.
The spiral galaxy M33. 2.7 million light years from Earth, about 60,000 light years wide.
Spiral galaxy IC 342 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope. About 10 million light years away, about 75,000 light years wide.
Image Credit & Copyright: Arturas Medvedevas.
The spiral galaxy M81 (NGC 3031). 12 million light years away, about 90,000 light years wide. Image Credit & Copyright: Paolo De Salvatore (Zenit Observatory).
The spiral galaxy M83 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.
The spiral galaxy M83 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope. 15 million light years away, about 55,000 light years wide.
The spiral galaxy M 106. 24 million light years away, about 135,000 light years wide. Image Credit: NASA, ESO , NAOJ, Giovanni Paglioli; Assembling and Processing: R. Colombari and R. Gendler.
The spiral galaxy M63 (NGC 5055, or sunflower galaxy). 30 million light years away, about 100,000 light years wide. Image Credit & Copyright: Bernard Miller.
The spiral galaxy NGC 6744. 30 million light years away in the southern constellation Pavo, it is about 175,000 light years wide.
The spiral galaxy NGC 6744. 30 million light years away in the southern constellation Pavo, it is about 175,000 light years wide.
The spiral galaxy M96 (NGC 3368). 31 million light years from Earth, about 75,000 light years wide. Image credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble; processing & copyright: Leo Shatz
The spiral galaxy M95 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory.
The spiral galaxy M95 (NGC 3351) observed by the Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory. 33 million light years away, about 45,000 light years wide.
The spiral galaxy M77 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope. 47 million light years away, about 170,000 light years wide.
The barred spiral galaxy NGC 2442 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory.
The barred spiral galaxy NGC 2442 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory. 50 million light years away, about 75,000 light years wide.
The spiral galaxy M61 in the Virgo Cluster of galaxies, observed with the European Southern Observatory telescopes. About 50 million light years away, about 100,000 light years wide. Credit: ESO.
The barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.
The barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope. 55 million light years away, about 65,000 light years wide.
The spiral galaxy NGC 1232 observed with the European Southern Observatory telescopes. About 60 million light years away, about 200,000 light years wide.
The barred spiral galaxy NGC 1300 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.
The barred spiral galaxy NGC 1300 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope. 70 million light years away, more than 100,000 light years wide.
The spiral galaxy NGC 6814 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.
Spiral galaxy NGC 6814 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope. Active! 75 million light years away, about 85,000 light years wide.
The spiral galaxy NGC 3147. Credits: NASA, ESA, Stefano Bianch (Università degli Studi Roma Tre University), A. Laor (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology), and M. Chiaberge (ESA, STScI, and JHU) 130 million light years from Earth, 140,000 light years wide.

Elliptical galaxies

This is a gallery of images of elliptical galaxies, in order of increasing distance from us.

The giant elliptical galaxy M87, more than 120,000 light-years wide, is the most luminous galaxy of the Virgo Cluster, about 50 million light years away.
The giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1316 (Fornax A), observed with the European Southern Observatory telescopes. This is a radio galaxy about 60 million light years away, in the Fornax cluster of galaxies. Credit: ESO.
The young elliptical galaxy NGC 3610 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope. 80 million light years away, about 80,000 light years wide. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Judy Schmidt. 
The elliptical galaxy NGC 1132. 300 million light years from Earth, about 240,000 light years wide. Credit: M. West (ESO, Chile), NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration.
The giant elliptical galaxy ESO 325-G004. About 420 million light years from Earth, it has a mass of 100 billions Suns. Credit: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA); J. Blakeslee (Washington State University)
Interacting galaxies

This is a gallery of images of interacting galaxies of our Local Universe.

Interacting galaxies Arp 87 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.
The interacting spiral galaxies Arp 87 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.
The interacting galaxies Arp 273 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.
The interacting galaxies Arp 273 observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.
The three interacting galaxies ESO 593-IG 008 observed with the European Southern Observatory telescopes and the Hubble Space Telescope.
The interacting galaxies Arp 271. Credit: ESO.

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